Al Jolson


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Synonyms for Al Jolson

United States singer (born in Russia) who appeared in the first full-length talking film (1886-1950)

References in periodicals archive ?
A Al Jolson did not star in either of the musicals and was portrayed in both by American actor Larry Parks.
The guy in blackface has to be Al Jolson, who starred in the movie as a Jewish boy whose father, a cantor, wanted him to give up his career on the popular stage and succeed him.
A AL Jolson was America's most famous entertainer in the 1920s and starred in the first talkie movie - The Jazz Singer in 1927.
El conjunto comienza con una obra estrenada el ano 1976, Te llamabas Rosicler, y finaliza con una del 2001, Escucho discos de Al Jolson, mama .
In the Roaring Twenties, Al Jolson was the world's most dynamic performer and for those who saw him in his fabulous pomp (like George Burns, who lasted long enough to work with Sinatra and Elvis) he was truly The Greatest, the Performer of the Century.
When Jolson Was King: Sittin' On Top Of The World by musical historian and biographer Richard Grudens is the engaging life story of the life and remarkable rise to fame of world famous actor, singer and entertainer Al Jolson.
There are even hints of Al Jolson on Irving Berlin's ``I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm.
Davis and Heilbroner also offer clips of celebrity whistlers (such as Al Jolson, Harpo Marx and, fleetingly, Elvis Presley), and acknowledge the dark side by including Peter Lorre's sinister trilling from Fritz Lang's "M" (1931).
Still, it's one of the most in-depth looks at Broadway ever attempted, and cowriter director producer Michael Kantor dutifully covers the high points--if he doesn't speak to stars like Carol Channing, Harvey Fierstein, Ethel Merman, Nathan Lane, Stephen Sondheim, Fred Ebb, Al Jolson, Tommy Tune, Chita Rivera, Joel Grey, and countless others, you can be certain you'll see clips of them performing.
He, by contrast, had vivid, firsthand memories of seminal stars like Fanny Brice, Al Jolson, and Bert Williams.
But shortly before his release, the former clubland Al Jolson impersonator from Leeds went to the Appeal Court on a legal aid case paid for by taxpayers.
Readers might be forgiven for approaching Michael Alexander's Jazz Age Jews with trepidation: the book features a blackface picture of Al Jolson on the cover followed by a dedication page that finds the author declaring his love for his parents through a quotation from Jolson's first big hit song, "Swanee": "I love the old folks at home
George Jessel plays the lead, but he is replaced by Al Jolson when the play is made into the first "talkie.
He (decided to) bring down a troupe of Broadway people, including Al Jolson, the great singer, to entertain Coolidge, that hopefully they could get him to smile -- which no one could -- and they'd take a picture, and he would look warm and fuzzy.
However, to paraphrase Al Jolson, "You ain't seen nothing yet