age

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Related to Age-specific death rate: Crude Mortality Rate
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Synonyms for age

years

Synonyms

a long time

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • a second
  • a moment
  • an instant
  • a short time
  • a flash
  • a little while
  • a split second
  • no time at all
  • a jiffy
  • two shakes of a lamb's tail
  • the twinkling or wink of an eye

a long time or while

Synonyms

grow old

come of age

Synonyms

Synonyms for age

a particular time notable for its distinctive characteristics

a long time

to grow old

to bring or come to full development

Synonyms for age

References in periodicals archive ?
16 Rate per 100,000 population Figure 1 Annual average age-specific death rates of accidental alcohol poisoning (ICD-9 code: E860), United States, 1996-1998.
A broader comparison of epidemiologic patterns associated with the pandemic at 12 locations on different continents highlights substantial variations in the timing, number of pandemic waves, and age-specific death rates (Table 2).
Oeppen and Vaupel (2002) considered alternative models for forecasting based on extrapolations with constant and nearly equal percentage declines in age-specific death rates based on stochastic process models introduced by Lee and Carter (1992), as implemented in Tuljapurkar, Li, and Boe (2000).
As death rates at older ages decline, the rate of increase in total life expectancy at these ages converges to the rate of increase in life expectancy at birth, implying that the intersection problems inherent in direct extrapolation of age-specific total life expectancies can be avoided by extrapolating age-specific death rates.
The Lee-Carter model (Lee and Carter, 1992) for forecasting mortality rates has been used to demonstrate that changes in the logarithms of US national age-specific death rates during 1900-1989, and beyond, can be accurately represented as a random walk with drift, an especially simple type of time series structure.
In contrast, age-specific death rates in the 1918 pandemic exhibited a distinct pattern that has not been documented before or since: a "W-shaped" curve, similar to the familiar U-shaped curve but with the addition of a third (middle) distinct peak of deaths in young adults [approximately equal to] 20-40 years of age.
Age-specific death rates have documented a substantial risk for death among those under 5 years of age and among those 60 years of age and older, although the number of deaths in children under 5 years declined in 1997 (Figure 5B).