African American Vernacular English

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Related to African-American English: Black English Vernacular
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Synonyms for African American Vernacular English

a nonstandard form of American English characteristically spoken by African Americans in the United States

References in periodicals archive ?
The standard variety of African-American English is Standard African-American English (Spears 1988: 99; Hoover 1978: 66), which has been described as being characterized by standard grammar and syntax melded with distinctively African-American phonology, intonation and cadence (see Spears 1988: 102; Garner & Rubin 1986: 33).
Existing descriptions of Standard African-American English referred to above do not incorporate the pragmatic level of language; yet pragmatics is a core element of Standard African-American English which differentiates it from White Standard English.
The pragmatic features of African-American English have often been described in the literature (see, e.
What Castro and Boudreaux agree upon is that the debate over African-American English and its utility in the classroom must be done above the racial divide.
Through the course, teachers are trained never to criticize students who speak in African-American English or demean them.
However, a day later amid a firestorm of controversy, Boudreaux modified her position and said African-American English is a dialect of English - not a separate language.
Superintendent Sid Thompson and Boudreaux have praised the $3 million-a-year program, which has trained 2,000 teachers to accept African-American English as a legitimate language.
Through the course, teachers learn never to criticize students who speak in African-American English.
Lasken, who lives in Woodland Hills, said it was a ``ridiculous contention'' that African-American English is a separate language.
Since 1990, the district has spent $3 million a year on a program that uses African-American English to help African-American children master language skills.
Board of Education member Barbara Boudreaux, who Thursday supported Ebonics as its own language, said she now believes African-American English is a dialect of English.
Los Angeles Board of Education member Barbara Boudreaux said Thursday that she will ask her colleagues next month to affirm African-American English as a unique language.
Since 1990, the Los Angeles Unified School District has spent $3 million on a program that uses so-called African-American English to help African-American children master language skills.
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