Adirondacks


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  • noun

Synonyms for Adirondacks

a mountain range in northeastern New York State

References in periodicals archive ?
The 54,000-square-foot museum provides indoor and outdoor science based programs, exhibits and experiences with 50 species of live animals, including otters, birds, and fish, all native to the Adirondacks.
Critique: The Adirondack Mountains are an unusual geological formation located in the northeastern lobe of Upstate New York in the United States.
Since striking a partnership one year ago, Adirondacks Premier Properties and Williams & Williams have sold three privately owned waterfront homes.
Get ready for gorgeous views of the Adirondacks, the stately high-alpine range that dominates upstate New York with a distinctly different aesthetic than New England's.
Signature Chairs specialize in "Big Man" Adirondacks designed for beauty, character, comfort and longevity.
In New York State alone more than 970,000 acres of land have been conserved in the last five years, a large percentage of that in the Adirondacks.
After numerous attempts and presentations to potential candidates, I remembered having visited a folk school in Grand Marais, Minnesota, and the idea of creating a similar school for the Adirondacks became my answer.
Adirondack Park Agency Chairwoman Leilani Ulrich said Sunday's announcement helps "preserve some of the most spectacular natural resources and scenery in the Adirondacks, while also promising the people of the Adirondacks that they are going to be able to use these lands and help derive economic benefits from their increased public use.
Adirondack roots; stories of hiking, history, and women.
An Elegant Wilderness: Great Camps and Grand Lodges of the Adirondacks 1855-1935" tracks the history with photographs surrounding these sites throughout the wilderness.
People who are from this region of NY get a sentimental feel from the Adirondacks.
The Adirondacks, a six-million-acre park made up of public and private lands, is as big as the state of Vermont, and the protections given to its woods are some of the most stringent in the world.
Beginning with an account of the banning of Jews from resort hotels in the late 19th Century, Hopsicker traces the spread of anti-Jewish sentiment in the Adirondacks through to the establishment of outdoor clubs, and their attempts to wrestle with pro and anti-Jewish membership factions in their own ranks.
The firm received the award for its design work on the National History Museum of the Adirondacks in Tupper Lake, NY.