accounting firm

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  • noun

Words related to accounting firm

a firm of accountants who provide accounting and auditing services for a fee

References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the existing research in the Australian context has been focused on the large 'big four' accounting firms and the metropolitan operational context.
The Best Accounting Firms to Work for list is made up of a total of 100 companies, split into three groups: 47 small-sized companies (15-49 employees), 45 medium-sized companies (50-249 employees) and 8 large-sized companies (more than 250 employees).
While the small public company audit market is much less concentrated, the four largest accounting firms continue to audit almost all large public companies.
member firms, claiming that both worldwide alliances were "united accounting firms.
For accounting firms looking to start a mentoring program, two keys include not getting bogged down in administrative procedure and establishing the right mentor-protege relationship.
In some respects, the accounting firms have been hostage to the companies that engaged them originally for audit work.
Ever since the SEC issued its new rules, two types of tax services have raised serious questions from investors, auditors, regulators and others as to the ethics and independence of accounting firms that provide both auditing and tax services.
accounting firms subject to Sarbanes-Oxley and the PCAOB had to be registered "to the same extent as a public accounting firm that is organized and operates under the laws of the United States.
He has also served on the management of mid-size accounting firms, plus the printing and publishing committees of the NYSSCPA.
Most non-competition agreements written for employees of public accounting firms serving small to medium size business include the following key clauses: (1) non-compete clause, (2) severability clause, (3) remedies clause, (4) arbitration clause, and (5) trade secrets clause.
Section 103 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act directs the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board to adopt an auditing standard that requires each registered public accounting firm to retain for a period of not less than seven years audit workpapers and other information that support the conclusions in the auditor's report.
Some commentators argue that Sarbanes-Oxley was an "equal and opposite" to corporate governance and accounting scandals and suggest that attempts to minimize or mute the changes represent "whistling past the graveyard" by the accounting firms or, worse, evidence that proponents "just don't get it.
Many accounting firms offer auditing and consulting services.
The National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies complained to regulators in a National Association of Insurance Commissioners committee late last year that several top-tier accounting firms were requesting or demanding that their mutual audit clients agree to indemnify those firms against any misrepresentations of management.
Keep in mind that the SEC's rule pertains only to accounting firms in the context of their audit clients who are SEC registrants.