70

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Synonyms for 70

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and seven

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being ten more than sixty

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References in periodicals archive ?
Diaspora synagogues are older than those in Judea for obvious reasons: the Jews in the Land of Israel still possessed a Temple up to 70 CE, so they had no need to develop synagogues.
The authors outline scholarly trends that emphasize the gradual and diffused growth of rabbinic Judaism from 70 CE to the fourth century and treat the rhetorical gaps between authoritative claims in rabbinic literature and social reality.
They were ruthlessly suppressed, culminating in effect with the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE.
Up to 70 CE courses and over 2000 non-CE computer, business, and technical on-line courses may be made available to both PIA members and non-members.
Scholar, classical composer, and linguist Salm, based in Eugene, Oregon, provides archaeological evidence that the town of Nazareth was not settled until after the First Jewish War, about 70 CE.
Just as Jews had to reinvent themselves after the destruction of the Temple and the metropolitan center of Jerusalem in 70 CE, so today they are reinventing themselves after the catastrophic loss of European Jewry in 1933-45.
Among them are how the fall of Jerusalem in 70 CE influenced the development of Christianity, Philo and classical drama, the three phases of Jewish-Christian relations, and religious education and the presentation of Judaism in public schools in Norway.
Rabbinical Judaism formed its response to the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE out of the paramount theology of Scripture, contends Neusner (Bard College), and should be characterized as prophetic-Rabbinic Judaism, the necessary continuation of Scripture's paramount system.
He nowhere asks about the viability of such a literary-theological construction in the period after 70 CE, when the reality of Jerusalem's destruction by Rome would seemingly render such an obscure vision of God's territorial supremacy an odd exercise in theodicy.
Ossuaries, carved limestone boxes containing bones after the flesh has rotted away, were a common practice of burial in Israel from about 100 BCE to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE, and thousands have been found and stored.
Jewish leadership in Roman Palestine from 70 CE to 135 CE.
The tomb in question is dated prior to 70 CE, when ossuary use in Jerusalem ceased due to the Roman destruction of the city.
This second volume covers the period from approximately 30 to 70 CE, the first generation of the Christian movement.
After recounting the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 70 CE, Elie Wiesel notes, "All people usually celebrate victories.