70

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Synonyms for 70

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and seven

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being ten more than sixty

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References in periodicals archive ?
Basing his reconstruction of Jewish socio-political leadership of this period on rabbinic literature rather than on Roman Empire historiography, he examines how consistently these models of leadership available before 70 CE were followed until the end of the Second Commonwealth period.
Relating the modern predicament of Jews in Israel to the situation faced by the rabbis after 70 CE, Eisen suggests that the model of pragmatism and the survival instinct of the Jewish community--core to Jewish culture--should be the "criteria for deciding whether Jews should support a peaceful or violent reading of Judaism" (228).
The tomb in question is dated prior to 70 CE, when ossuary use in Jerusalem ceased due to the Roman destruction of the city.
Her new novel, The Dovekeepers, set during the fall of Jerusalem in 70 CE, will be published by Scribners in October 2011.
This second volume covers the period from approximately 30 to 70 CE, the first generation of the Christian movement.
After recounting the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 70 CE, Elie Wiesel notes, "All people usually celebrate victories.
The section on the "Jewish city" begins with its foundation and ends with the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in 70 CE.
The worlds largest model of the Holy Temple was inaugurated close to the Temple Mount, where the Temple existed up until 70 CE.
More famously there was Josephus, a first-century Judean who wrote several books about his people, including an account of the First Revolt, which resulted in the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 CE.
After the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, the Galilee (and Zefat in particular) became a center of Jewish scholarship and habitation.
Tisha b'Av is a reminder for Jews of the destruction of the first temple in 586 BCE (Before Common Era) and the second one, in 70 CE (Common Era), by the Romans.
In the year 70 CE, the Romans crushed the Jewish rebellion in Judea against their emerging empire, razing Jerusalem and burning the Second Temple to the ground.
She also helped characterize the garments and textiles found at the Fortress of Masada, the site of the Roman siege during the last days of the Jewish uprising in 70 CE.
IN THE MIDDLE OF AUGUST 70 CE the ancient city of Jerusalem was nearly completely destroyed by a vengeful Roman army.